Community Benefits

The DCP identifies five key priorities for negotiated community benefits, each of which is addressed in a meaningful way in this project. The project program and design incorporates a thoughtful and comprehensive set of Community Benefits.

The Ocean Avenue Project brings: mobility and circulation, publicly accessible open space, affordable housing, cultural institutions and historic preservation.

Mobility and Circulation

We are committed to a project with seamless circulation among the different elements and with the surrounding areas, whether entering the site by foot, bicycle or car. The ground level pedestrian experience is open and connected site-wide. Vehicular/pedestrian interactions are limited to reduce conflict, and all street frontages other than the alley to 2nd Street are free from vehicular exit/entry points. The articulation of building facades creates a variety of sidewalk widths and spaces to facilitate pedestrian movement.

Publicly Accessible Open Space

Landscaped courtyards and paseos are integrated throughout the project. This layout allows porosity and designates approximately 25% of the site area as public open space at the ground level.

A publicly accessible observation deck of approximately 5,000gsf, located at the top of the hotel building, allows for panoramic views of Santa Monica and the ocean, transforming the building height into a public amenity.

Affordable Housing

Together with market rate rental housing, the project will provide urgently needed affordable housing to the Downtown, in accordance with the guidelines of the Downtown Community Plan.

Cultural Institutions/Public Art

An approximately 40,000 sf museum will create space for collections of artistic, cultural, historical or scientific importance to be exhibited in the Downtown.  Opportunities exist for public art to be displayed in the vast open space, paseos and courtyards.

Historic Preservation

The project will preserve, protect and adaptively reuse two landmarked buildings that exist on the site, including a Queen Anne style Victorian building (c. 1906) and a two-story Spanish Colonial Revival building (c. 1926). The museum will incorporate the two buildings into its design, creating visitor access to this rich part of our City’s history.